CENTER FOR

IMMIGRATION LAW, POLICY AND JUSTICE

Center for Immigration Law Director Prof. Rose Cuison-Villazor will be testifying before the NJ Assembly in support of A4225 and remove immigration status as a barrier to getting professional licenses in NJ

Prepared Remarks in Support of A4225 New Jersey Assembly July 20, 2020  Rose Cuison-Villazor Vice-Dean, Chancellor’s Social Justice Scholar and Professor of Law Director, Center for Immigration Law, Policy and Justice   My name is Rose Cuison-Villazor and I am the Vice-Dean and Professor of Law at Rutgers Law School in Newark and I teach, research and write about immigration law.  I am also the founding Director of the Center for Immigration Law, Policy and Justice.  The Center for Immigration Law explores and supports the adoption of equitable and more inclusive laws, regulations, policies, and practices for all people, citizens […]

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DACA DREAMERS

DACA Victory!

We at the Center for Immigration Law, Policy and Justice (“Center for Immigration Law”) are extremely pleased with the Supreme Court’s opinion on Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA).  In Department of Homeland Security v. Regents of California, 591 U.S. __ (2020), the majority of the Supreme Court held that the federal government’s rescission of DACA was “arbitrary and capricious.”  It recognized that DACA was a policy that did more than provide deferred action, but also provided benefits such as allowing DACA recipients to work.  By arbitrarily revoking DACA, the federal government failed to consider DACA recipients’ legitimate reliable interests on the policy.   This historic […]

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Prof. Randi Mandelbaum Comments on Denials And Delays of Special Juvenile Status Applications

Reuters reported on the increased rejections of applications and delays in the processing of applications filed by immigrant youths under the Special Immigrant Juvenile (SIJ) program. Under SIJ, immigrant youths (defined as those who are below 21 years old) may submit an application for permanent residency if they have been abused, abandoned, or neglected by a parent. As CILPJ affiliate faculty and Child Advocacy Clinic Director, Prof. Randi Mandelbaum explained, the law requires the administration to process these applications within six months.  Yet, she has cases that have lingered for over a year. Here’s the rest of the story.

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